The effect of MyD88 deletion on autoimmunity driven by Foxp3 inactivation

Over last 10 years few subjects in immunology have received more attention than regulatory CD4 T cells called in abbreviation Tregs. Tregs are considered to have the potent suppression activity over adaptive immune responses and their lack may result in the autoimmunity development. The central trait pertinent to Tregs is the expression of the transcription factor Foxp3.  The essential role of Foxp3 in Tregs’ life is underscored by the fact that Foxp3-deficient mice or human patients with mutations in the respective gene acquire massive systemic autoimmunity due to the absence of Tregs and generally do not fare well. The publication I have found adds yet another twist to Tregs and Foxp3 story. It turns out that the concurrent to Foxp3 deletion of MyD88 (the crucial adaptor protein linking the innate recognition of microbial signature patterns to the expression of genes involved in defense mechanisms) imparts effects that are not identical between major environmental surfaces (skin, gastrointestinal tract or lungs) and the systemic compartments.

The link: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/40591

Foxp3-deficient mice suffer from the advanced inflammatory skin condition and as a result have grossly increased skin pathology indicators like dryness, loss of hair and bleeding. Apart from that their ears and tails are seriously necrotized. However, animals deleted for both Foxp3 and MyD88 show many substantial improvements. Authors demonstrate that the removal of MyD88 from Foxp3-deficient background diminishes immune infiltration to the epidermis and locally deactivates molecular pathways involved in the amplification of inflammatory signals and cellular trafficking (NF-κB translocation to the nucleus, the expression of ICAM-1 on keratinocytes). Additionally, the skin level of numerous cytokines is reduced in doubly deficient animals compared to mice with the single Foxp3 deletion.

What is remarkable, MyD88 deletion on Foxp3-deficient background has also significant systemic effects because such mice grow to much bigger size than visibly runted Foxp3 single mutants. Therefore investigators analyze the extend of immune infiltration in multiple organs of double Foxp3/MyD88 mutants and find out that they have decreased inflammation scores and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines not only in the skin but in the small intestine and lungs as well. However, the alleviating consequences of MyD88 removal are restricted to environmental surfaces as the symptoms characteristic for Foxp3 deletion continue unabated in the liver and the pancreas of Foxp3/MyD88-deficient animals (and are even enhanced in their salivary glands). Moreover, the detailed examination of spleen and lymph nodes (authors indicate that they focus on skin draining lymph nodes and mesenteric lymph nodes) shows that cellular counts, proliferation indicators and the expression of various cytokines are elevated in Foxp3/MyD88-deficient mice compared to animals with Foxp3 deletion.

Such difference between the systemic compartments and environmental surfaces could be explained by several factors. Authors show that introducing MyD88 deletion to Foxp3-deficient background disrupts the chemokine gradient between lymph nodes and effector tissues. They also demonstrate that homing ability of CD4 T cells to lungs is incapacitated and as a consequence lymphocytes may accumulate in draining lymph nodes. Finally, in a series of adoptive transfer experiments it is established that the protective effect of MyD88 deletion acts at the level of target tissue and is independent on whether CD4 T cells express MyD88.

In an interesting, although not entirely conclusive part of the paper authors follow the hypothesis that the protective influence of MyD88 deletion in this model may be due to the removal of capability to process activation signals derived from microbiota. To prove such concept they attempt to mimic the effect of MyD88 ablation by purging commensal bacteria from gastrointestinal tracts of Foxp3-deficient animals with two different antibiotic treatments. The first such treatment includes two antibiotics (doxycycline and cotrimoxazole) and indeed relieves some symptoms of Foxp3 inactivation in the skin and lungs. However, the second regimen comprising four antibiotics (kanamycin, vancomycin, metronidizol, and amphotercin-B) actually worsens the state of Foxp3-deficient animals and accelerates their death. I would be interesting to know what part of commensal microflora can be hold responsible for either such protective or detrimental effects in the context of ongoing autoimmunity.

Rivas MN, Koh YT, Chen A, Nguyen A, Lee YH, Lawson G, & Chatila TA (2012). MyD88 is critically involved in immune tolerance breakdown at environmental interfaces of Foxp3-deficient mice. The Journal of clinical investigation, 122 (5), 1933-47 PMID: 22466646

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